General assembly question

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Jeff L
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General assembly question

Post by Jeff L » Tue Dec 20, 2011 6:50 pm

When you build your bike...Do you use some kind of thread lock In addition to lock washers to secure your parts?
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Maz
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Re: General assembly question

Post by Maz » Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:13 pm

I use a variety of methods to secure threads etc...on the girder forks I use grub screws (I think you guys call them set-screws) and on anything that is likely to vibrate loose I tend to use thread lock. For threads that don't get too hot I like to use nylocs and then fit a thread finisher (my own sylver bullets) which I thread lock into place.

On the rare occasions that I build a competition or ultra-high performance bike (or hotrod) then I cross drill the heads of the bolts and lock-wire them into place...... :think:

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Re: General assembly question

Post by railroad bob » Tue Dec 20, 2011 8:30 pm

There are at least 3 types of Locktite threadlocker for different services.
And as Maz stated there are mechanical choices also.

One not usually mentioned is thread peening, which means slightly damaging a thread on a connection after installation,
but only slightly. This prevents a nut from easily backing off, and in fact, if done properly, a nut needs a fair amount of effort to be removed past the damaged area, but can still be removed.
This can be used in a remote location with no access to normal tools. A light tap with a hammer and a pointed tool on the thread closest to the nut does the job.

Not to be confused with "pinging", which is tapping a bolted connection to listen to the resulting sound. A ringing sound indicates a torqued connection, a dull thread indicates a loose connection. NOT used in vehicle work normally, where a torque wrench is preferred.
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Re: General assembly question

Post by budoka » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:40 pm

for me personally, i like to use nylock nuts where i can and then let the bike tell me what needs some thread locker. keep in mind that i try to go over almost every bolt and nut on the bike after *every* ride until i've ridden it enough to feel it has "settled in." even then, i am a stickler about maintaining my bikes.

i don't think you really need to over do the threadlocking compound. and it has no place on an engine or transmission at all. just my .02.

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Jeff L
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SELF INTRODUCTION: Hey...I live in South Jersey (the Super Fund State) work as an Operating Engineer local825.Besides bikes I love to fish the surf.I have my current & seemingly endless project a BSA 750 Rocket3, a 72 Honda CB750,79 Kawasaki KZ1000, 48 Simplex, & a 62 Norton Atlas engine
Location: South Jersey

Re: General assembly question

Post by Jeff L » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:05 pm

Thanks for the replys.... I'm curing some parts in the oven as I type this, so hopefully I'll be puttin some things together real soon.
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Re: General assembly question

Post by monkeywrench202 » Wed Dec 21, 2011 10:02 am

In my world, lock-washers are an evil item. they split, break, fall out, and just are never reliable. Good thread-loc, and proper torque on all fasteners makes the difference. As stated, bolt-tightening sessions are a must for many rides.

One piece of advise - if using any type of stainless fasteners, make sure thatyou put something on the threads, no matter what. They love to gall up and lock up tighter than a pop-corn fart. Loc-tite, anti-sieze, greese, ect, never put a stainless fasteners together dry.

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Re: General assembly question

Post by curt » Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:37 pm

anything that has a vibration to it i use locktight be careful with the red though it can be a real pain to get back apart .if its somethin that needs to be serviced regularly use the blue
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Re: General assembly question

Post by yona » Thu Dec 22, 2011 2:02 pm

I just use nylon fishing line , stuck into the nut as it goes on and make nylocs out of all the nuts....works as good as blue loctite and easy to disassemble...
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Jeff L
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Posts: 568
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2011 5:09 pm
SELF INTRODUCTION: Hey...I live in South Jersey (the Super Fund State) work as an Operating Engineer local825.Besides bikes I love to fish the surf.I have my current & seemingly endless project a BSA 750 Rocket3, a 72 Honda CB750,79 Kawasaki KZ1000, 48 Simplex, & a 62 Norton Atlas engine
Location: South Jersey

Re: General assembly question

Post by Jeff L » Thu Dec 22, 2011 10:22 pm

Hey.... That's a good idea.What lb.test line do you use?
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Re: General assembly question

Post by joe49 » Sat Dec 24, 2011 6:36 pm

yona wrote:I just use nylon fishing line , stuck into the nut as it goes on and make nylocs out of all the nuts....works as good as blue loctite and easy to disassemble...
Ditto, has worked for me for the last 35 years.

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railroad bob
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SELF INTRODUCTION: Hi Dan, thanks for your time and energy spent on this new board. I hope you will give me a waiver on the email account, I have used gmail so long I don't have a clue what my service provider account is.
I just returned home from a 2 week trip in New Mexico, have a few good pix, can't wait to share my off-highway traveling. Got to put 1400 miles on the scoot.

Best, Bob Davidson
Location: Alaska

Re: General assembly question

Post by railroad bob » Sat Dec 24, 2011 6:45 pm

Now I know what to do with that crap I find on the riverbank where some jerk left it birdnested in a bush.
Alaska - Land of the Individual and Other Endangered Species
An Armed Society is a Polite Society,...
Politicians Prefer Unarmed Peasants
Principle of 7 P's: Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

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